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Sixty years after the principle of equal pay for men and women for equal work or work of equal value was first laid down in Article 119 of the EEC Treaty (currently Article 157 of the Treaty on the Functioning of the EU), the EU today faces a gender pay gap that has remained constant at a relatively high level for decades. The most recent Eurostat data show an average figure of 16.3 % (for the year 2015) for the 28 EU Member States. Although there is a big difference between the countries with the lowestpay gap (Italy and Luxembourg, both with 5.5 % in 2015) and the country with the highest pay gap (Estonia, with 26.9 % in 2015), and although these figures represent the so-called ‘unadjusted’ gender pay gap (i.e. not adjusted according to individual characteristics that may explain part of the difference), there are signs that all over Europe sex-based pay discrimination remains a problem that should not be underestimated.

The text of this report was drafted by Petra Foubert, coordinated by Alexandra Timmer, Erin Jackson and Franka van Hoof for the European network of legal experts in gender equality and non-discrimination.

 

This report by the European network of legal experts in gender equality and non-discrimination aims to examine the current situation of the enforcement of non-discrimination law in Europe with regard specifically to Roma and their rights. The report is based on the professional assessment of 27 national non-discrimination experts of the European network of legal experts in gender equality and non-discrimination, and covers all EU Member States, with the exception of Malta.

 

The Social Summit for Fair Jobs and Growth, taking place in Gothenburg on 17 November, will focus on how to make the most of new opportunities and tackle common challenges for the labour markets and welfare models of today and tomorrow. By building on each country’s perspective and experience, discussions will contribute to shaping a better future for Europeans.

 

On 20-21 November 2017 the European Commission hosts its Annual Colloquium on Fundamental Rights. This year’s theme is ’Women’s Rights in Turbulent Times’. The recent media attention on harassment in particular, and women’s rights in general, has highlighted that there are still many challenges to achieving gender equality in our societies, making this year’s Colloquium particularly topical. Women are still underrepresented in decision-making positions, both in politics and the business world; women still earn 16% less than men on average across the EU; and violence against women is still widespread. On 25 November, the European Commission will also mark the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

 

13 November 2017 - Brussels, Strasbourg, Vienna, Warsaw - On the 10th anniversary of the landmark judgment of the European Court of Human Rights on the segregation of Roma children in education, equality and human rights organizations call for a redoubling of efforts to bring children together in the spirit of Europe’s commitment to dignity, equality and human rights.

 

The vast majority of Muslims in the EU have a high sense of trust in democratic institutions despite experiencing widespread discrimination and harassment, a major survey by the European Union Agency for Fundamental Rights (FRA) shows. The survey captures the experiences of Muslim immigrants and their EU-born children, revealing that public attitudes have changed all too little over the last decade.

 

The Council of Europe’s Anti-racism Commission (the European Commission against Racism and Intolerance - ECRI) in a new report concludes that Slovenia satisfactorily implemented two out of three recommendations made in its last country monitoring report for priority implementation within two years.

 

A new 2012-2017 report on Montenegro published by the Council of Europe’s Anti-racism Commission commends the authorities for strengthening protection against hate crimes, empowering the Ombudsman and improving the situation of Roma. Yet, LGBT persons are still targets of violence, Roma remain at risk of social exclusion and segregation, and no reliable data on hate crimes exists.

 

“The right to education is a fundamental human right. Yet, many European countries still deny thousands of children, including children with disabilities, Roma children and refugee or migrant children, equal access to it by keeping them in segregated schools. This is a violation of children’s human rights with far-reaching negative consequences for our societies. Member states have an obligation to secure the right of every child to quality education without discrimination”, said the Council of Europe Commissioner for Human Rights, Nils Muižnieks, while releasing a paper on tackling school segregation through inclusive education.

 

This study, commissioned by the European Parliament’s Policy Department for Citizens’ Rights and Constitutional Affairs at the request of the LIBE Committee, examines the added value of developing a democratic rule of law and fundamental rights-based approach to the protection of minorities in the EU legal system, from an ‘intersectional’ viewpoint.

 

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