Members’ section
Sign in
Personal identifiers

Equinet - European network of equality bodies

Home >> Members >> Members’ Publications >> Ireland: Black Non-Irish Five Times More likely to Experience (...)

Ireland: Black Non-Irish Five Times More likely to Experience Discrimination Seeking Work

December 18th 2018

New research has shown that Black non-Irish people are five times more likely to experience discrimination when seeking employment in Ireland when compared to White Irish people. Black non-Irish people are over two and a half times more likely to experience discrimination when in employment compared to White Irish people.

New research has shown that Black non-Irish people are five times more likely to experience discrimination when seeking employment in Ireland when compared to White Irish people. Black non-Irish people are over two and a half times more likely to experience discrimination when in employment compared to White Irish people.

The new study entitled “Ethnicity and Nationality in the Irish Labour Market” looks at Central Statistics Office (CSO) data from the Quarterly National Household Survey Equality Modules from 2004, 2010 and 2014 to capture how labour market outcomes and the experience of discrimination have changed through economic boom, recession and early recovery.

The research published by the Irish Human Rights and Equality Commission (‘the Commission’) and the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI) examines the experience of immigrants and minority ethnic groups in the Irish labour market across four measures: employment rates; occupation; discrimination when seeking work and in the workplace.

Some of the key findings include:

  • People from the Black non-Irish group are less than half (0.4 times) as likely to be employed than White Irish and five times as likely to experience discrimination when seeking work.
  • People from the Black Irish group are twice as likely to experience discrimination seeking work and just under three and a half times (3.4 times) as likely to experience discrimination in the workplace as White Irish.
  • Both the Black Non-Irish and Black Irish groups are much less likely to hold a managerial or professional job.
  • The White EU-East nationals group are much less likely to hold a managerial or professional job but show no difference in their rates of employment.
  • The Asian Irish group of people do not differ in terms of employment rates and are more likely to be working in professional/managerial occupations but are almost twice (1.9 times) as likely to experience workplace discrimination.
  • Overall it seems that the disadvantage experienced by some groups in relation to securing employment in top jobs (managerial/professional level) appears to be narrowing over the period since 2004.

The report’s analysis includes lessons from the findings for Ireland:

  • Future labour market policies should consider the significant variation found in outcomes of ethnic groups.
  • Recognising foreign education qualifications may account for some difficulties faced by non-Irish nationals. It is important that awareness of recognition of skills and qualifications attained abroad is promoted among both immigrants and employers to prevent skills being underutilised and enable job mobility.
  • Raising awareness and the provision of information about equality legislation to immigrant and resident communities and the supports available is identified as an important mechanism to prevent discrimination.

Read more on the IHREC website